IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: Joe Mathews: Why it’s dangerous to ignore alarms from Stockton

SACRAMENTO, CA – Joe Mathews, syndicated columnist and California politics expert, wrote an opinion piece on Proposition 53 and the measure’s proponent, Dean Cortopassi. Mathews reminded readers not to forget Stockton’s recent bankruptcy and the impacts massive debt can have on a community.

Proposition 53 would simply require a public vote for state megaprojects that use more than $2 billion in state revenue bonds.  It would also increase transparency by ensuring the disclosure of the total cost of a project before the vote.

Read excerpts from Joe Mathews’ opinion piece, “Why it’s dangerous to ignore alarms from Stockton,” below:

“One lesson of this California election should already be clear: Don’t dismiss apocalyptic warnings from Stockton.

If you have a television, you’re seeing a barrage of ill-advised Stockton dismissals. Gov. Jerry Brown, labor unions and Sacramento infrastructure lobbies are trying to defeat Proposition 53 – which would require voter approval for state revenue bonds of $2 billion or more – by marginalizing it as the flawed idea of a rich, selfish Stockton farmer.

This messaging turns out to be doubly wrong, as I learned on a recent visit. For one thing, “Stockton farmer” badly underestimates Dino Cortopassi, a formidable businessman with a taste for difficult fights. For another, the political message trivializes the real trauma in the city of 300,000 in the aftermath of its municipal bankruptcy.”

Read the opinion piece on Zócalo Public Square’s website here: http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2016/11/03/california-can-learn-stocktons-debt/inquiries/connecting-california/

Proposition 53 would require statewide voter approval for state revenue bond projects costing more than $2 billion, closing a loophole that allows politicians to issue massive new debt for multi-billion dollar projects without voter approval. For more information, visit: www.YESon53.com.

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